What do you mean by Multiple Gestation Pregnancy and its complications?

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What do you mean by Multiple Gestation Pregnancy and its complications?

Posted By Steve Hicks     January 29, 2021    

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Can you imaging twins, triplets, and quadruplets in a single womb. Is it not amazing? For example, if you are going to give birth as triplets then your womb has 6 legs - 6 arms -3 heads, all in a fairly confined space. So a pregnancy with more than one baby at a time is known as Multiple gestation pregnancy. Simply a pregnancy with more than one fetus is known as multiple gestations. In the situation when more than one egg or fetus is released during the menstrual cycle and each is fertilized by a sperm, more than one embryo may implant and grow in your uterus. 

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What are the causes of multiple gestations?

 

Multiple gestations is not a science, it can happen randomly. If a woman ovulates more than an egg or fetus during a cycle, each egg has the potential to be fertilized by sperm.

 

If two sperm fertilize with two different eggs, a woman will become pregnant with non-identical twins. In some rare situations, a fertilized egg divides into two, identical twins are developed. 

 

Does two gestational sacs mean twins? 

 

A gestation sac is the large cavity of fluid surrounding the developing embryo. A gestation sac consists of the extraembryonic coelom, also known as the chorionic cavity. The gestational sac is normally carried within the uterus. It is the only available case that can be used to define if an intrauterine pregnancy endures until the embryo is identified.

 

A twin gestational sac is understood as vanishing twin syndrome. It helps to early scan reveals a twin pregnancy, but only one baby is seen at a later dating scan. After five weeks of pregnancy vanishing twin syndrome statistics scan can locate two gestational sacs and you can confirm twins in your womb.

 

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What are the complications in multiple gestations? 

 

Being pregnant more than a baby is exciting and is often a life-changing phase. However, multiple pregnancies have increased complications. The most common complication is the following -

 

Pre Birth or labor pain: The higher the number of fetuses in the pregnancy the higher you may have labor pain. In this situation, premature babies are born and they may suffer for the whole life. The babies are often small and may have low birth weights. Many organs of the babies are not developing and that may increase the risk of the potential of babies physically.



In a complicated situation, sometimes a pregnancy with one placenta and two amniotic sacs, babies can share a placenta and this gives a major risk. such as twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome. This term we can understand as two amniotic sacs, one baby. 

 

The other complicated situation is intrauterine growth restriction twins. In this condition, one or both twins don't grow well. They may have enough space to develop and others have a small gestational age. It can affect twin pregnancy. Babies may have health problems that may lead to long-term medical care. 

 

In the worst case, a situation of birth defects and miscarriage also possible. 




Article Source : https://giftsfortwins.over-blog.com/2021/01/what-do-you-mean-by-multiple-gestation-pregnancy-and-its-complications.html

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